Missouri Weinland of Mid-America

Artist: Tibor Nagy, copyright 1981
The first wines ever to be produced in Missouri came from wild grapes found by French Jesuit Priests on their seminary grounds in Florissant, Missouri. The year was 1823. Since then, Missouri wines have been famous for their unique quality and rare taste. Even today, there are more varieties of wild grapes in Missouri than in any other state of the Union. The first grape plantings were made in German, Missouri in 1843 because the area was a natural habitat for grape production. By 1866, Missouri was the second largest wine-producing state in the country, and St. Louis was the nation’s chief center of wine study and research. In 1867, George Hussmann, professor of horticulture at the University of Missouri, and Hermann Jaeger, a Neosho, Missouri grape breeder, advised French viticulturists to graft their phylloxera devastated vineyards onto Ozark vine roots to save them from this dreadful disease. Prior to Prohibition, there were wineries in 48 Missouri counties. Cape Girardeau, Hannibal and Owensville were some of the famous Missouri winery addresses. The current revival begun in 1965, continues today through the efforts of the Missouri Wine Advisory Board, established in 1979, under the Missouri State Department of Agriculture. The greatest honor for the Missouri wine industry came when the Augusta region was officially designated as “America’s First Viticulture Wine District” in 1980.

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Artist: Tibor Nagy, copyright 1981
The first wines ever to be produced in Missouri came from wild grapes found by French Jesuit Priests on their seminary grounds in Florissant, Missouri. The year was 1823. Since then, Missouri wines have been famous for their unique quality and rare taste. Even today, there are more varieties of wild grapes in Missouri than in any other state of the Union. The first grape plantings were made in German, Missouri in 1843 because the area was a natural habitat for grape production. By 1866, Missouri was the second largest wine-producing state in the country, and St. Louis was the nation’s chief center of wine study and research. In 1867, George Hussmann, professor of horticulture at the University of Missouri, and Hermann Jaeger, a Neosho, Missouri grape breeder, advised French viticulturists to graft their phylloxera devastated vineyards onto Ozark vine roots to save them from this dreadful disease. Prior to Prohibition, there were wineries in 48 Missouri counties. Cape Girardeau, Hannibal and Owensville were some of the famous Missouri winery addresses. The current revival begun in 1965, continues today through the efforts of the Missouri Wine Advisory Board, established in 1979, under the Missouri State Department of Agriculture. The greatest honor for the Missouri wine industry came when the Augusta region was officially designated as “America’s First Viticulture Wine District” in 1980.